FAQs

Everything you need to know! If it's not here, ask me on my contact form.

What is a book coach and why would I need one?

First of all, everyone needs a coach! Watch a TEDtalk about it HERE.A book coach is a person who has a deep and expansive knowledge of the foundational building blocks of story. They understand what draws a reader in and what pushes them out of a story, and they know how to apply that knowledge universally with each project they take on. A lot of them are writers as well, so they are empathetic of the struggle and pain that writers experience as they take on a project.A book coach is also a project manager for your novel--they are there to poke you with a stick to keep you moving forward or put up a stop sign when you start swerving off course. A good book coach will be pushy, demanding, do-your-best-and-be-consistent project manager, but also someone who can listen, clarify, and empathize as you craft your story.​If you are here, you are probably a writer. Even if you've been on NYT's best-selling list, you can benefit from a professional coach who analyzes your work and provides feedback on how to get even better at it. In most professions, but especially writing, it can be hard to step back from your work and look at it from different perspectives. A book coach does that and more.

What services does a book coach provide?

Lots of things! A book coach helps generate, clarify, and refine story ideas with an in-depth process that helps clients blueprint their novel. They offer ongoing developmental editing with frequent submissions, feedback, and one-on-one coaching. Chapter edits and manuscript edits are also common, with the emphasis remaining on the big picture--coaches may point out grammar usage errors, but their focus is on big story issues that could sabotage the novel. Once a novel is properly written, edited, and revised, a book coach can help their client pitch to agents, if they would like to pursue traditional publishing.

Project management is another focus. Book coaches collaborate with their clients to create timelines and project frameworks to meet deadlines and maintain forward momentum. This can be incredibly helpful for writers who struggle to find the time and motivation to write.

Lastly, book coaches act as emotional support for their clients through the whole long, messy, painful experience of writing and publishing a book. Most of us are writers and we been through the same slog. Anyone who says writing is easy is full of sh*t.


What a book coach doesn’t do:

I am NOT a copy editor or a proofreader. I am a top-level developmental editor, project manager, and personal cheerleader.

I'm not a ghostwriter.

I'm also NOT a therapist. Difficult emotions tend to spring up in the process of writing a novel--at least any novel that is saying something important. It’s normal, even expected, and I will absolutely support, empathize, and validate your experience, but my job is not to help you resolve trauma. 

I'm not a marketing professional. I'll help you write, revise, and pitch a manuscript, but I don't do marketing.


What are your genre preferences?

My niche is speculative fiction that centers itself around LGBTQ+ characters.
Speculative fiction is a broad umbrella category that includes:

  • Fantasy (low and high)

  • Science Fiction

  • Fairytale 

  • Superhero fiction

  • Steampunk/Cyberpunk/Ecopunk fiction

  • Post-apocalyptic fiction

  • Crossworld fantasy

    And a lot more...

 

I love stories that imagine new and different ways that the world could be, either in the future or the past. Found family tropes, enemies to lovers, deep philosophical questions about what  makes us human--all my jam! If you have questions about whether or not I'd be interested in your story, fill out my intake form here.

 

What a book coach doesn’t do:

 

I am NOT a copy editor or a proofreader. I am a top-level developmental editor, project manager, and personal cheerleader.

I'm not a ghostwriter.

I'm also NOT a therapist. Difficult emotions tend to spring up in the process of writing a novel--at least any novel that is saying something important. It’s normal, even expected, and I will absolutely support, empathize, and validate your experience, but my job is not to help you resolve trauma. 

I'm not a marketing professional. I'll help you write, revise, and pitch a manuscript, but I don't do marketing.

I have a specific system I use already/ I don't like to plan/ I like to plan EVERYTHING... Can you still help me write my book?

Raise your hand if you've ever done a NaNoWriMo! (National Novel Writing Month, for the uninitiated)
NaNo is great fun, and it likes to classify its participants as Planners (you have a detailed outline), Pantsers (you have a blank sheet of paper and lots of enthusiasm), and Plantsers (you are somewhere in the middle of these two extremes).
Maybe you love plotting structures like The Hero's Journey, the Snowflake Method, or the Three-Act Structure... 
These systems can work for people-- but none of them are perfect. 
The biggest issue with them is that they put too much emphasis on creating a plot--the things that happen in your story. 

But wait, why is that a bad thing? Isn't a good plot important?

YES. Plot is important, but it's not everything--the real magic comes from the story. The story is the way that your protagonist will change, transform, and grow (internally, emotionally) from page one to page three-hundred. The story is the meaning they make from the plot. And that is the real reason we humans are so drawn to a good story. Our brains are predisposed to try and make meaning out of everything.
So while plot structures are useful, they can also hold us back. 
I want to help you write your book in the best way for you specifically. No cookie-cutter plotting mechanism is going to be tailored to you, but I can help you find the best path to reach your goals.